Erin Reid, Ph.D.

Assistant Director of Research

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Erin Reid joined the Early Math Collaborative in 2013. She received her doctorate in school psychology from Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include understanding and promoting mathematical development in young children; identifying and promoting skills, behaviors, and attitudes that contribute to academic success; assessing and promoting parent and teacher knowledge, beliefs, and practices that facilitate math learning in young children; and developing measures of skills, attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to mathematics learning or teaching.Erin has worked with children and youth in a variety of capacities over the years. She was the program director for a child care center, worked as a psychometrician conducting psychoeducational testing at a residential diagnostic center serving adjudicated juveniles, and served as a school psychologist for a school district and early intervention unit. Erin’s passion for early mathematics grew as the result of being the program manager on a federally funded grant aimed at developing brief measures of early math and literacy skills for use in Head Start Classrooms. Later, she was a recipient of a Head Start Graduate Scholar Research Grant where she developed and evaluated a mathematics curriculum for preschool-aged children enrolled in Head Start. More recently, she was awarded an IES Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Mathematics Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she helped design and evaluate computer-assisted interventions targeting specific preschool math concepts.

Publications

  • Reid, E. E.

    , Baroody, A. J., & Purpura, D. J. (2015). Assessing young children’s number magnitude representation: A comparison between a novel and a conventional task. Journal of Cognition and Development. doi: 10.1080/15248372.2014.920844

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    Abstract

    Previously, researchers have relied on asking young children to plot a given number on a 0-to-10 number line to assess their mental representation of numbers 1 to 9. However, such a (“conventional”) number-to-position (N-P) task may underestimate the accuracy of young children’s magnitude estimates and misrepresent the nature of their number representation. The purpose of this study was to compare young children’s performance on the conventional N-P task and a “modified” N-P task that is more consistent with a discrete-quantity view of number and with measures of theoretically related mathematical competencies. Participants (n = 45), ranging in age from 4;0 to 6;0, were administered both versions of the N-P task twice during 4 sessions in 1 of 2 randomly assigned and counterbalanced orders. Between and within conditions, children were significantly more accurate on the modified version than on the conventional task. The results indicate that the conventional task, in particular, may be confusing and that several simple modifications can make it more understandable for young children. However, when performance on theoretically related number tasks is taken into account, both the conventional and the modified N-P tasks appeared to underestimate competence.

  • Reid, E. E.

    , DiPerna, J. C., Missall, K., & Volpe, R. J. (2014). Reliability and structural validity of the Teacher Rating Scales of Early Academic Competence. Psychology in the Schools, 51, 535-553.

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    Abstract

    Currently, there are few strengths-based preschool rating scales that sample a wide array of behaviors believed to be essential for early academic success. The purpose of this study was to assess the factor structure of a new measure of early academic competence for at-risk preschool populations. The Teacher Rating Scales of Early Academic Competence (TRS-EAC) includes two broad scales (Early Academic Skills and Early Academic Enablers) and was completed by 60 teachers for 440 children enrolled in Head Start and public preschool classrooms. Evidence from two exploratory factor analyses supported a five-factor solution for the Early Academic Skills Scale (Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking Skills, Numeracy, Early Literacy, and Comprehension) and a five-factor solution for the Early Academic Enablers Scale (Approaches to Learning, Social and Emotional Competence, Fine Motor Skills, Gross Motor Skills, and Communication). TRS-EAC scores also demonstrated good to excellent reliability and were related to children’s performance on direct measures of early academic skills.

  • Reid, E. E.

    , Morgan, P. L., DiPerna, J. C., & Lei, P. W. (2006). Development of measures to assess young children’s early academic skills: Preliminary findings from a Head Start-university partnership. Insights on Learning Disabilities, 3(2), 25-38.

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Research Presentations

  • Reid, E. E.

    , Baroody, A. J., & Purpura, D. J. (2013, April). Impact of interventions on preschoolers’ successor principle understanding and linear representation of number. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, WA.

  • Reid, E. E.

    , Baroody, A. J., & Purpura, D. J. (2011, September). Assessing a linear representation of the counting numbers. In A. J. Baroody (Chair), Issues in assessment and scoring of early numeracy skills. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the Society for Research in Educational Effectiveness, Washington, D.C.

  • Reid, E. E.

    , DiPerna, J. C., Morgan, P. L., Lei. P., & Wu, Q. (2008, November). Early Arithmetic and Reading Learning Indicators: Assessing preschoolers’ early academic skills using progress-monitoring measures. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, Dallas, TX.

  • Reid, E. E.

    , & DiPerna, J. C. (2008, June). Promoting early numeracy skill growth in Head Start children: NumberFun pilot study. Poster session presented at the Head Start’s Ninth National Research Conference, Washington, D.C.

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